Elvis Presley “Can’t Help Falling in Love” Guitar Chords

Published Categorized as Acoustic Guitar Songs, Chords

Who else has reclined on the bed of Elvis Presley’s croon and wished they might be able to sing along? Or wished that they might be able to serenade a loved one, to make them feel as special as you feel every time the record spins and it feels as though every particle of Elvis’s voice is addressing itself to you and only you? I know I certainly have. And now you can, with the handy help of this comprehensive tutorial and study of the song in question. Outlined below you will find the basic elements of the song, vital to musicians of all varieties, whether you are here for the song in all its original glory, or whether through the song as popularised by Twenty One Pilots.

Elvis Presley “can’t Help Falling In Love” Guitar Chords

Table of Contents

The Story

The song itself was a number one hit in its day, finding home in the outstretched arms of his largely teenage audience, particularly those of hormonal females.

Written in 1961 by Hugo Peretti, Luigi Creatore, and George David Weiss for the feature film Blue Hawaii, the song saw separate release as a hit single by the popular demand of said audience, which was based on a previous song: ‘Plaisir d’amour’, a popular French love song, or chanson, composed as far back as 1784(!) by Jean-Paul-Egide Martini.

This aspect ought to be absorbed with a particularly wry outlook, considering the copyright case filed against the band Spiritualised when they used the song’s melody on their famous, eponymous track, ‘Ladies and Gentlemen We Are Floating in Space’. The melody isn’t even theirs to lay claim to!

The forlorn, passion-soaked nature of the track comes through in the lyrics and the music, the arpeggiated guitar chords laying an apposite bed for the longing croon present throughout.

The Song ‘Can’t Help Falling in Love’

The song is in a swung 6/8, so each chord will almost always be counted to its full 6 beats before changing, some even stretching to two whole bar measures.

As the chords are arpeggiated throughout, this might be a perfect opportunity to exercise your abilities in this regard, for the arpeggiation is at its most basic here, moving through the chord, travelling up and down in pitch before resolving to the next chord each time. It’s actually one of the eight easiest love songs to play on a guitar!

There are more chords here than you might typically be used to, so familiarising yourself with the individual chord shapes before jumping right in would be a great idea, though I would strongly encourage you to engage, as this would be an ample moment to exercise the dexterity and relationship between both your fretting hand and picking hand.

The song, as can be seen in the corresponding film scene, is played with a capo on the 2nd fret, so here would also be a good place to practise transposition, an area that the guitar’s same-looking fretboard excels in. If you’re going to try playing without a capo, try working the “love chords” out yourself before using the guide below…

This tutorial’s tablature accompaniment will be centred on the ascension and descension through the arpeggios of the chord structure, so see if you can work out the chords of your own accord before googling them elsewhere. According your studies with as much of your own intuition and conscience as possible will ensure that your conscious and subconscious are engaged enough for this learning to be instilled within you and subsequently through your muscle memory as well.

can't help falling in love guitar chords
Intro
can't help falling in love guitar chords
Verse
can't help falling in love guitar chords

Structure

The structure, once grappled with and played along to, shouldn’t pose a problem, being fairly typical of the pop medium popularised by Elvis throughout his career:

  • Intro
  • Verse 1
  • Chorus
  • Verse 2
  • Chorus
  • Verse 3

Transposition

As mentioned above, the song as heard originally is played with a capo on the second fret, so I hope you already know how to transpose guitar chords. If you, for whatever reason, are choosing to play without one then following the guide below will be vital if you are unable to work these chords out in their new form yourself, though I would strongly encourage you to give it a try first.

With CapoW/out capo
CD
EmF#m
AmBm
FG
GA
B7C#7
A7B7
DmEm

Might I suggest, as the accompaniment for me works best arpeggiated, that you attempt to work out a new way of arpeggiating through this version of the chords of your own volition? I can’t stress enough how much this will propagate and bolster the strength of your neuroplasticity as it acclimatizes itself to new things, and nowhere is this more immediately clear and applicable than in the study of a musical instrument.

Final Tones

If you have followed the instructions as above then there isn’t much more for me to say besides ‘happy crooning’! May these chords and arpeggios serve you well as building blocks on your journey skyward, to mastering guitar and harmony, and to harnessing it all for the furthering of your own creative ventures. And once you master playing this song on a guitar, try playing Can’t Help Falling in Love on Ukulele!

FAQs Can’t Help Falling in Love Guitar Chords

Can’t Help Falling In Love With You guitar fingerstyle?

This song can be played in a variety of different ways, and the song’s enduring legacy as a song covered by successive generations of artists who have delighted in attempting to reinvent what the song can be; literally yesterday I saw a couple playing the song on a public piano in a shopping mall – sure, it took me a second to recognize it, but there it was nonetheless. The arpeggiated nature of the chords in the original recording does lend itself to fingerstyle guitar, wanting to bring all of the strumming fingers into a chordal collaboration. Likewise, these chords can just as easily be plucked with a plectrum as is typically the fashion with covers of this song by more novice and amateur musicians.

Can’t Help Falling in Love No Capo?

Though the song is typically played with a capo on the 2nd fret (which can be seen in the scene from the film Blue Hawaii where Elvis himself serenades a young lover with precisely this song), it can also be played without a capo. Now would actually be an opportune moment for the budding and aspiring guitarist to practice their abilities with transposition, wherein they might follow the chords above or from the scene in the film and then try and move the chords around so that they might be played without the capo. These things are always more firmly embedded in the mind when they are learned oneself, so get to it!

What key is can’t help falling in love in?

The song overall is in D major, though it floats through a whole bunch of different chords throughout its duration. The song is in a swung 6/8, so each chord will almost always be counted to its full 6 beats before changing, some even stretching to two whole bar measures. There are more chords here than you might typically be used to, so familiarising yourself with the individual chord shapes before jumping right in would be a great idea, though I would strongly encourage you to engage, as this would be an ample moment to exercise the dexterity and relationship between both your fretting hand and picking hand.

By Nate Pallesen

Nate is just your average (above average) guitar player. He's no Joe Satriani, Jimi Hendrix or Jimmy Page - wait this site is about acoustic guitars (sorry) He's no Django Reinhardt, Chet Atkins, or Michael Hedges, wait? who!? He's no Robert Johnson, Eric Clapton or Ben Harper - more familiar? Anyway you get the point :-)

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