Piano Chords for Way Maker

Published Categorized as Chords

If you’re a fan of worship music, you know that a great song has the power to bring people together. “Way Maker” is powerful modern hymn. Though it’s originally by Sinach, we’ll be taking a look at the version by the band Leeland. Here are the piano chords for Way Maker!

Table of Contents

Quick Guide: Piano Chords for Way Maker

To play Way Maker, you need four chords: A, E, B, and C#m. If you don’t know them, here’s a quick guide to playing each with your right hand in root position. Chord charts are also great tools to help you remember!

A Major (A)

  • Play A (two white keys to the left of middle C) with your thumb
  • Play C# (black key to the right of middle C) with your middle finger
  • Play E (two white keys to the right of middle C) with your pinky

E Major (E)

  • Play E (two white keys to the right of middle C) with your thumb
  • Play G# (two black keys to the right of E) with your middle finger
  • Play B (four white keys to the right of E) with your pinky

B Major (B)

  • Play B (one white key to the left of middle C) with your thumb
  • Play D# (two black keys to the right of B) with your middle finger
  • Play F# (black key to the right of D#) with your pinky

C# Minor (C#m)

  • Play C# (black key to the right of middle C) with your thumb
  • Play E (two white keys to the right of middle C) with your middle finger
  • Play G# (two black keys to the right of E) with your pinky

Song Structure: Way Maker

If you want to see the keyboard while walking through the song, check out this helpful YouTube tutorial.

Let’s start with an instrumental intro and the first verse. Most versions repeat the first verse twice:

piano chords for way maker

Here’s the chorus, which is repeated twice as well:

piano chords for way maker

Now to the second verse:

piano chords for way maker

After that, we jump straight into the third verse:

piano chords for way maker

Now back to the chorus (most versions repeat it four times):

piano chords for way maker

This next part is called a “refrain” or “tag.” It’s usually repeated twice:

piano chords for way maker

Now, we repeat the chorus twice again:

piano chords for way maker

Next, we go to the bridge. Repeat this four times:

piano chords for way maker

Now we repeat the chorus twice:

piano chords for way maker

And repeat the refrain twice:

piano chords for way maker

One more chorus repeat:

piano chords for way maker

One more instrumental break:

piano chords for way maker

And finally, repeat the refrain twice:

piano chords for way maker

You probably notice that this song has a somewhat meandering structure. If you’re playing a solo version and want to shorten it a bit, you can experiment with the song structure or move toward a more traditional verse/chorus/verse/chorus/bridge/chorus format. It’s up to you!

Improving Your Musical Craft

This inspiring song offers you an opportunity to really grow as a musician. There are only four chords you need to know, so that makes Way Maker an opportunity for you to hone other skills. It’s a good song to practice singing and playing at the same time!

Try playing different inversions of the chords, playing multiple octaves with your left hand, and shifting chord dynamics with the mood of the song. When you make an effort to make a song your own, you’ll grow in both confidence and musical skill!

FAQ

Still have some questions on how to play Way Maker on piano? Here are some answers:

How do you play Way Maker on piano chords?

To play this song on piano, you just need A, E, B, and C#m. You can simply repeat the chords, or you can play arpeggios, try different chord inversions, etc.

What are the chords for Way Maker?

In the Leeland version of Way Maker (the one we looked at above), the chords are A, E, B, and C#m.

How do you play Way Maker on keyboard?

Since the music in Way Maker is only four chords, it’s a good idea to mix up how you play. Try playing the chords higher or lower on the piano, playing chord inversion, etc.

What is the original key of Way Maker?

The Leeland version (the one looked at above) is in the key of E. However, the original Sinach version is in the key of B.

By Nate Pallesen

Nate is just your average (above average) guitar player. He's no Joe Satriani, Jimi Hendrix or Jimmy Page - wait this site is about acoustic guitars (sorry) He's no Django Reinhardt, Chet Atkins, or Michael Hedges, wait? who!? He's no Robert Johnson, Eric Clapton or Ben Harper - more familiar? Anyway you get the point :-)

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